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The Witham Abbeys
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» Barlings Abbey
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Abbeys of the Witham Valley

The Witham Valley is remarkable for the number of monasteries that once lay alongside it. On the east bank there were six: Barlings; Stainfield; Bardney; Tupholme; Stixwould and Kirkstead, with three more: Nocton; Catley and Kyme, on the west bank.

They were all virtually within sight of one another. This unusual concentration probably came about because of the high ecclesiastical status of Lincoln and easy access to the Witham, a busy trade link between Lincoln and the port of Boston. The major income of the monasteries came from wool production and the link to the river, and to the trade and wealth that flowed up and down it, was vital.

   Bardney Abbey
A guide to the history and remains of the Benedictine abbey. The village of Bardney lies nine miles east of Lincoln on the east bank of the River Witham. In the 7th century an abbey was founded here making it the first of the group of monastic houses that dominated the Witham valley from the 12th to the 16th centuries.
  Find out more about Bardney Abbey
   Barlings Abbey
A guide to the history and remains of the Premonstratensian abbey. The stark ruins of Barlings Abbey lie seven miles east of Lincoln on the west bank of the Barlings Eau, a tributary of the River Witham.
  Find out more about Barlings Abbey
   Tupholme Abbey
A guide to the history and remains of the Premonstratensian abbey. The name 'Tupholme' has ancient origins. The first part, 'Tup' is a country word for sheep, and 'holme' comes from the Saxon word for island, or raised piece of ground.
  Find out more about Tupholme Abbey

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